Reviews & Ramblings

Review & Ramblings: Dark Blue Rising by Teri Terry

Published July, 2020 by Hachette Australia

Synopsis:

Tabby’s life is turned upside down, ripped away from the woman she called her mother. She finds solace in the ocean, but there’s something wrong. What is the symbol of interlocking circles that follows her everywhere? To learn the truth, Tabby must uncover the terrible lies about her past. And the secret is hidden in her DNA

My Review:

Dark Blue Rising is fast paced from the get go. We are thrown into what feels like an incredibly small town, with tyrannical teenagers and our mysterious protagonist.
As always Terry has a way of making you want to learn more, she writes so well that you lose yourself in her words.

Tabby is such a complex character. Everything she knows is a lie, her world is shattering around her, it is heart breaking. She is pure and innocent and lonely and the loss of Cate and her own identity is adding salt to the wound. You genuinely feel terrible for her, and want everything to be okay.

Tabbys‘ call to the ocean is something that resonates with me. There is something about the ocean that is calming and invigorating all at the same time. But for Tabby, it feels like the ocean is her home, like she is meant to be there and I can’t help but feel like there is a somewhat supernatural link for her.

When we are first told about the Penrose Clinic I knew something was up. Abnormal blood tests, the ocean calling, monthly check ups, it all felt off. And slowly we are shown the extent of what The Penrose Clinic is doing and what they are trying to achieve.

From the first to last page, Dark Blue Rising is intense and captivating. It is unique and in true Terry style, written beautifully. Our protagonist Tabby goes through so much in these 390 pages. More than anyone should have to deal with in a life time. Yet she is still brave and strong at the end.

I need the next book. I need to know what happens, what Tabby is, what the Penrose Clinic has been doing and about the dolphins.
Dark Blue Rising is a fascinating read, one that will leave you guessing, long after you read the final page.

Thank you to Hachette Australia for sending me out a review copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

blog tour, Reviews & Ramblings

Blog Tour: The Year The Maps Changed by Danielle Binks

Published by Hachette Australia. May 2020

The Year the Maps Changed is a wonderful tale of life as Winifred(Fred). A girl of 11, nearly 12, growing up in a blended family and trying to work out what that means. Fred is also trying to understand what it means to be a refugee, with a refugee camp having been opened in her town, she is quickly realising that the world isn’t what it seems.

It is a delight to read from Fred’s point of view, to get lost in her innocence and her intrigue. She is so smart and intuitive, she has been through so much heartache and change, but she can’t seem to grab a foothold in this new family dynamic that she is part of.

This book will make you contemplate life in a new way. Seeing the world from a 12 year olds perspective is amazing, we see Fred go through so much, we watch her grow up and interpret the world around her.

The Year The Maps Changed covers a lot of controversial and complex ground. From refugees and racism, to families, nursing homes and pregnancy. There is so much intertwined that makes this story so great.
So easy to read that the pages fly through your fingers, the writing style is perfect for an 11/12 year old narrator, yet she seems so wise for her 12 years.

Luca is an incredible character. He is the perfect example of a police officer. He is firm but fair, calm, loving, gentle and kind. He has peoples best interests at heart and he wants the best for his family. Luca’s relationship with Winnie is heart warming. His love for her oozes from the pages.

The Year the Maps Changed is a coming of age story that shows how important being yourself is. It shows the power of family, friendship, forgiveness and standing up for those who need it. Throughout, we see Fred turn into Winnie, a brave, bright and courageous young girl. We see her bloom in the face of loss and confusion. This book really tells us a story of wrong and right, a story of people and how they fit in the world.

Thank you so much to AusYaBloggers and Hachette Australia for having me join in on the blog tour for this amazing book.

Reviews & Ramblings

Review & Ramblings: Fifty Fifty by Steve Cavanagh

Publication 11th April, 2020. Hachette Australia

From the first page, Fifty Fifty draws you in. It is easy to read, fast paced, meticulously detailed and filled with complex characters. This is a book that will have you teetering on the edge of your seat, trying to piece together the evidence from this chilling murder.

As the book progresses the plot twists keep coming and trust me, you won’t see them coming. Cavanagh writes in such a suspenseful way, you won’t be able to guess what comes next. Even when you turn the last page, you will still be trying to work out how you, Eddie and Kate were blindsided by the Avellino sisters.

I love the female characters in this book. They are strong and confident, powerful and brave. But they are also gentle and concerned and have their own demons to face.

Fifty Fifty is well written, fast paced, well researched and legal savvy. It is rough and gritty and raw. It is a fantastic work of crime fiction and will not be the last Cavanagh book I read. Cavanagh has created a world within the legal system that is engaging and has one foot in the darker side of things. The characters are fantastic and the plot is completely original. This is one crime fiction novel, you do not want to miss.

Thank you to Hachette for sending me out a review copy of this book!

Reviews & Ramblings

Review: Only Mostly Devastated by Sophie Gonzales

Published by Hachette. March 3, 2020

Right from the first page, you can tell that this book is going to be light, funny and have amazing characters.
Gonzales has done an amazing job of combining moving to a new city, family illness and starting a new school and not making it heavy. Yes these are sad, nerve wracking, emotionally laden topics, but somehow Gonzales has made it easy to read and not focussed solely on the hard stuff.

I am living for the Grease parallels. Even though this is definitely its own story, the parallels are fantastic. Will is definitely a Danny and Lara is mosy definitely a Rizzo. I can’t wait to read on and find more similarities throughout.

Our protagonist is such a gentle and kind figure. He babysits so his Aunt can have her treatments at the hospital, he gives up his senior year at his old school, without argument, to save his mum any additional stress. He is so selfless and wants, so much, for others to be happy. To a fault. He will lose himself if he isn’t careful.

Will and Ollie are so cute. They complement each other perfectly, yes they have their obstacles, but I am solidly in their corner. Will is slowly opening up and showing us who he is. I do find his story to be incredibly cliche, but that aside, I really enjoyed watching his character grow and evolve abd become the best version of himself. Staying true to himself and following his own dreams.

To piggyback off the above thoughts, I am so proud of Ollie. He stood up for himself and for his beliefs. He realised his self worth and refuses to be treated any less than he deserves. It is such a powerful message to any reader, that it isn’t okay for people to make you feek crappy about yourself, to make you feel anything negatively. You go, Ollie!

Only Mostly Devastated, is a book that deals with multiple, hard to deal with issues that so many people come into contact with, in their everyday lives. But Gonzales writes them, in such a way that they are easy to digest. They are easy to read and to be a part of, through her characters. Yes someone passing is horribly sad, no matter how it is written, but Gonzales writes her characters reactions with such care, kindness and authenticity, that it makes it easy to read, even if you are shedding a tear with Ollie.

The ending of this book is so sweet, it has its bitter moments, but overall such a sweet ending that makes you smile. It was the kind of ending that gives you warm and fuzzies yet promotes acceptance and tolerance of other people.

Only Mostly Devasated is fast paced, so, so easy to read and so relevent in today’s teen society. It reads easily and the pages practically turn themselves. The chatacters are deep and their progression feels natural, their growth doesn’t feel forced or faked. Ollie is a fantastic protagonist. He owns that he has flaws, he owns who he is and he isn’t apologising for either. He is the protagonist we didn’t know we needed.

Thank you so much to Hachette AUS for sending me out a review copy of this title. It is such a unique and fun read.

Only Mostly Devastated, is out NOW. You need this book on your TBR!

Reviews & Ramblings

Review & Rabmlings: The Liars by Jennifer Mathieu

This book gave me all of the Summer beach vibes, made me long for the soft sand and crashing of waves, but it didn’t make me long for Joaquin and Elena’s lives.

9781444946062

 

The Liars by Jennifer Mathieu

3/5 Stars

Published 5th September 2019 by Hachette Childrens Group

GoodReads

 

 

Blurb: It’s the summer of 1986. Joaquin and Elena, two teenage siblings live in a toxic environment with their alcoholic mother on an island off the Texas Gulf Coast.
Elena falls for a new boy who has just arrived from California. Joaquin must wrestle with his decision to stay on Mariposa Island to protect his sister or flee from his mother’s abuse.
As both teenagers struggle to figure out who they are and want to be, they are caught in a web of family dysfunction and secrets from their mother’s past.

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I was sent a review copy of this book by the amazing team at Hachette. I was surprised to receive it, I did request it, but being the author of the popular title, Moxie, I was sure that I would miss out on this one. I am greatful for the chance to read this book.

“The Liars’, was a three star read for me. Not because I didn’t enjoy it, I really did, but because I couldn’t escape the feeling that there was so much missing from the story.

Elena and Joaquin are siblings that are as close as two people can be, they need each other for their own survival. But it becomes clear, early in the book that living like that is only pushing eachother into separate directions. Elena and Joaquin, although they live under the same roof, live dramatically different lives. Joaquin is afforded some sense of freedom, freedom to leave the house, to get a job, to drive a car, to speak up for his beliefs. Whereas Elena, is house bound, forced to keep her opinions to herself, unable to get a job, have friends or to be a teenager. These differences alone, put their lives on completely different tragectories. Joaquin can leave, he can escape the tyrant style life that his mother Carrie is offering, but Elena, is likely to suffer long into adulthood, if not longer.

As you can probably tell from the title, this book is based upon lies, on top of lies. Some subtle, others blatantly obvious, but lies is what makes the world of Mariposa Island turn. Without spoiling this book, I want to say that one lie, the biggest of them all, is so complex and detailed, that it seems impossible for it to keep working, but it does, so much so that everyone, in the end, believes that it is true.  They are so comfortable with lies that when it is revealed that Carrie has been lying to her children, Elena is comfortable with it. As though the lie was necessary, something that was easy to accept. But for Joaquin it was the last straw.

Mathieu has written strong characters, characters that are deep, traumatic and real. They react with a realness that allows the reader to relate to them, no matter the readers gender. There is something in this book for everyone. The writing style will draw you in and not let you go, the pacing is perfect for the setting, when we are on Mariposa Island, it is slower, adjusted to the slow and sunny lifestyle of living in a beach-front town, but when we dart back into Carrie’s history, it speeds up, as though we are having the flashbacks as Carrie would.

The Liars, has all the makings of a fantastic book, but I feel that too much was left out for it to wrap up comfortably as a stand-alone title. There are too many loose ends surrounding Carrie’s history, her current state, what it is that is making her so controlling. Is there more than her need to have people to love and depend on her? We also don’t find out what happens to Elena. Elena is the first character we meet, the first character we really get to know and she is left hanging at the end, with no real positive prospects, just a long school year looming over her, trapped within the confines of her home. I, as a reader, just wish there was more information provided. But I still really enjoyed this title.

As I wrap up, I feel the need to mention that this book touches on issues such as psychological trauma, substance and physical abuse, neglect and bombing.

Is this on your TBR? Have you read it? Comment your thoughts below!

Thanks for reading,

Julie